ALL THE WAYS HOME

ALL THE WAYS HOME

Book - 2019/05/28
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After losing his mom, Kaede Hirano developed anger issues and spent his last year of middle school acting out.Best-friendless and critically in danger of repeating the seventh grade, Kaede is given a summer assignment: Write an essay about what home means to him, which will be even tougher now that he's on his way to Japan to reconnect with his estranged father and older half-brother. Still, if there's a chance Kaede can finally build a new family from an old one, he's willing to try. But building new relationships isn't easy, and one last desperate act will change the way Kaede sees everyone--including himself. This is a book about what home means to us--and that there are many different correct answers. Sometimes, home isn't even where you expected to find it.
Publisher: Feiwel and Friends
2019/05/28
Edition: HC
ISBN: 9781250166791

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samcmar Apr 15, 2019

I felt emotional reading All the Ways Home. Not only did the book make me nostalgic for my recent trip to Japan, but it made me feel for Kaede, a boy who just wants someone to love him after the death of his mother. While I cannot relate to way Kaede's mother dies, I can in the sense that like him, there are days where I pine for my folks because there is so much I want to tell them, and no way to truly do so.

This is the story of Kaede returning to Tokyo after the death of his mother. He's on the verge of failing 7th Grade, he's accidentally hurt his best friend back home in Vancouver, and he's trying to define what 'home' means to him. Arriving in Tokyo, he meets up with his brother Shoma, who takes him in for the three weeks he is there. Hoping to see his famous father while in Tokyo, Kaede learns that not every person is as they seem. The growth of Kaede and Shoma's relationship is one of my favourite aspects of this story. It's subtle, it shows how people can move from estrangement to a level of comfort, especially as Shoma recognizes that he hasn't been around for Kaede in such a long time, but when you learn why, you're able to empathize with him as much as Kaede.

I also loved the visuals that Chapman provides in this story. There's so many places that she references that I've been to, and it really took me back to my trip. At times I found myself poking my husband and yelling "WE'VE BEEN THERE!" which is silly, but it made me yearn for that kind of adventure again. Tokyo is an intense city, and I loved reading the bits where Kaede gets lost in Kabukicho, which was one of my favourite places to visit. Reading about the hustle and bustle of people's lives and being able to visualize it so clearly is a wonderful feat and Chapman makes the story feel so authentic, especially when she talks about both Canada and Japan. She reminded me of the beauty of both places in such a short novel.

Kaede's story is beautiful, and I was invested the whole way. My heart wept when he finally got to "meet" his father, his determination to find the meaning of home, and just how difficult it is to navigate the world when you're grieving everything you've lost. There is so much that me, as a thirty-year-old woman could relate to, even though this story is geared towards a middle grade audience. This is one of the sweet, most difficult middle grade novels I've read in a long time, and I urge everyone to check out because it's an emotional ride.

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