Sixty

Sixty

A Diary of My Sixtieth Year

Book - 2015
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Shortlisted for the Hilary Weston Writers' Trust Prize for Non-Fiction as well as a finalist for the RBC Taylor Prize, Sixty is a wickedly honest and brutally funny account of the year in which Ian Brown truly realized that the man in the mirror was...sixty. By the author of the multiple award-winning The Boy in the Moon .

Sixty is a report from the front, a dispatch from the Maginot Line that divides the middle-aged from the soon to be elderly. As Ian writes, "It is the age when the body begins to dominate the mind, or vice versa, when time begins to disappear and loom, but never in a good way, when you have no choice but to admit that people have stopped looking your way, and that in fact they stopped twenty years ago."
Ian began keeping a diary with a Facebook post on the morning of February 4, 2014, his sixtieth birthday. As well as keeping a running tally on how he survived the year, Ian explored what being sixty means physically, psychologically and intellectually. "What pleasures are gone forever? Which ones, if any, are left? What did Beethoven, or Schubert, or Jagger, or Henry Moore, or Lucien Freud do after they turned sixty?" And most importantly, "How much life can you live in the fourth quarter, not knowing when the game might end?"
With formidable candour, he tries to answer this question: "Does aging and elderliness deserve to be dreaded--and how much of that dread can be held at bay by a reasonable human being?" For that matter, for a man of sixty, what even constitutes reasonableness?


From the Hardcover edition.
Publisher: Toronto : Random House Canada, 2015
ISBN: 9780307362858
9780307362841
Branch Call Number: 155.67 BRO 2015
Characteristics: 313 pages
Alternative Title: 60

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SCL_Heather Aug 24, 2017

Even a well known journalist such as Ian Brown is not immune to bouts of self-doubt and existential angst. In particular, the occasion of his sixtieth birthday brings much of his anxiety to the fore and he decides to keep an online journal for the next year. Through the mundane events of every... Read More »


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SCL_Heather Aug 24, 2017

Even a well known journalist such as Ian Brown is not immune to bouts of self-doubt and existential angst. In particular, the occasion of his sixtieth birthday brings much of his anxiety to the fore and he decides to keep an online journal for the next year. Through the mundane events of everyday life, the bike rides to work, disagreements with his wife an daughter, and the more exotic, such as holiday hiking in Britain, Ian shares his reflections on life and aging.
The book is filled with self-deprecating humour and very honest feelings on everything from sex, to money woes, to a desire to feel that one’s life has meant something. Whether one can relate to the particular life of Ian Brown or not, the joys and pains of life afflict all of us and he reminds us that it’s important to take the time to notice. There is wisdom here for readers of any age.

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GaryRaab
Mar 15, 2016

Ian Brown in today's Globe. "Apparently some people were angry that he wrote a book about turning 60. Mostly men. They either 1) disdain his lamentations as the moanings of a wuss, or 2) consider the entire subject of aging to be an abomination."

Neither in my case...aging and thinking about it should be a part of everyone's agenda...and a diary as a method for personal discovery for Mr. Brown's personal use...so be it.

I am still angry about wasting my time reading that book!

My objection.3) Reading a book about an aging men, one would think to be entertaining or informative… but this book was neither

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Gung
Feb 16, 2016

I have listed to and enjoyed Ian Brown on the CBC. I heard him being interviewed about this book. I am older than Ian and I wondered how his 61st year compared to my memories of my 61st year. I had a much better 61st year than it seem did Ian. I got half way through Ian’s book and decided to stop. Later I picked up the book again and did something that I had never done before. I read the last chapter. I won’t say don’t read this book but be prepared to abandon it when you tired of it.

My next read was ‘History’s People’ by Margaret MacMillan. It was enjoyable and informative – it was a far better investment of my time.

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yalewa74
Feb 22, 2017

When you close your eyes you’re all the ages you’ve ever been.

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yalewa74
Feb 22, 2017

Is the only meaningful human activity, in fact, struggle? Page 132

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