More Notes of A Dirty Old Man

More Notes of A Dirty Old Man

The Uncollected Columns

Book - 2011
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"He loads his head full of coal and diamonds shoot out of his finger tips. What a trick. The mole genius has left us with another digest. It's a full house--read 'em and weep."--Tom Waits

After toiling in obscurity for years, Charles Bukowski suddenly found fame in 1967 with his autobiographical newspaper column, "Notes of a Dirty Old Man," and a book of that name in 1969. He continued writing this column, in one form or another, through the mid-1980s. More Notes of a Dirty Old Man gathers many uncollected gems from the column's twenty-year run. Drawn from ephemeral underground publications, these stories and essays haven't been seen in decades, making More a valuable addition to Bukowski's oeuvre. Filled with his usual obsessions--sex, booze, gambling-- More features Bukowski's offbeat insights into politics and literature, his tortured, violent relationships with women, and his lurid escapades on the poetry reading circuit. Highlighting his versatility, the book ranges from thinly veiled autobiography to purely fictional tales of dysfunctional suburbanites, disgraced politicians, and down-and-out sports promoters, climaxing with a long, hilarious adventure among French filmmakers, "My Friend the Gambler," based on his experiences making the movie Barfly . From his lowly days at the post office through his later literary fame, More follows the entire arc of Bukowski's colorful career.


Edited by Bukowski scholar David Stephen Calonne, More Notes of a Dirty Old Man features an afterword outlining the history of the column and its effect on the author's creative development.


Born in Andernach, Germany in 1920, Charles Bukowski came to California at age three and spent most of his life in Los Angeles. He died in San Pedro, California, on March 9, 1994.


Publisher: San Francisco : City Lights Books, c2011
ISBN: 9780872865433
0872865436
Branch Call Number: 813 BUK 2011 22
Characteristics: 247 p. ; 21 cm
Additional Contributors: Calonne, David Stephen

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PearlyBaker
Jul 27, 2015

This is my second favorite author next to Irvine Welsh. Like Welsh, I would pay to read Bukowski's grocery list. After finishing all of his novels and screenplay I thought there was only poetry left which I cannot cotton to quite yet. I was more than elated to find there are collections of articles and short stories, and many are ongoing tales of Henry Chinaski. Here are a couple of my favorite lines from this collection:

Incidentally, one of the best things I like about humans is that they do perish.

Sometimes when I talk I improve on things to make them better. Some people might call it lying but I call it an art form.

Sex is something you do to make yourself feel good so you can go one and do all the things that don't make you feel so good...

ericnorcross Oct 30, 2014

Good reading for the Bukowski fan. Some of it borders on edgy, all of it is incredibly personal as is most of his work. Some of the stories are familiar, as they were retold in some of his more popular novels. All in all, if you want a good Bukowski reader to pass the time, here it is.

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dirtbag1
Mar 16, 2012

Charles Bukowski is a little known gem. His observations coupled with his grit and honesty make for some great entertainment. Being a little rough around the edges gives Bukowski a unique perspective. The musician Tom Waits thought very highly of Mr. Bukowski. This is in my opinion a ringing endorsement. Although some consider his work 'alternative' his style provides depth and understanding in a world focused on conformity. Kudos to VPL for having his work on their shelves.

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